Season of Nonviolence

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Dear Peace Community,SNV(1)

In 1998, I was privileged to help plan and participate in the 1st Season for Nonviolence in Seattle.  Arun Gandhi, the grandson of Mahatma Gandhi, was our special guest, and led a crowd of up to 10,000 in a walk to Puget Sound, symbolic of Gandhi’s walk to the sea to establish Indians’ right to have free salt.  I have celebrated the Season every year since. Continue reading

Love…What the World Needs Now

Dear friends,what_the_world_needs_now
JRPC Invites You to Take Action for Peace and Love. In the wake of the 2016 election results there has been a huge increase in incidents of racist attacks and hate literature all over the United States. Even here in Missoula, there have been reports of anti-Semitic literature spread in some neighborhoods and threats to Har Shalom. Now more than ever before people of peace must be willing to stand up against hatred and bigotry to show solidarity with all people under threat. Continue reading

Write for Rights

Dear friends,amnestyinternational-logo

This is an invitation to sit down with other concerned citizens and write. On Wednesday, December 7, from 4:30 to 6:30 PM, as part of Amnesty International’s 2016 Write for Rights Campaign,  we’ll be writing letters on behalf of 12 individuals whose stories are being disseminated by AI. We’ll have lots of guidance—from the case histories and sample letters that AI provides. Given the horrific nature of these abuses, and the isolation of many of the victims, writing a letter to responsible officials may not seem effective. Why should they listen? Continue reading

Stand With Standing Rock

Dear friends,standing rock

Clean water is something that we are lucky to have and need to protect. In addition to plowing through native burial grounds on Labor Day weekend, the Dakota Access Pipeline threatens the water of the Missouri River. No environmental impact review was conducted on the pipeline that stretches over four states and at completion would deliver half of a million barrels of petroleum a day. The water protectors, as they are called, consisted first of the Sioux tribe which has banned together for the first time in 140 years. Continue reading