Never Again is Now

“History, despite its wrenching pain, cannot be unlived, but if faced with courage, need not be lived again.”

Maya Angelou

Dear Friends,

78 years ago yesterday, on February 19, 1942, President Franklin Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066. This order ultimately led to the forced relocation and incarceration of around 120,000 Japanese Americans and Japanese immigrants, 11,000 people of German ancestry, 3,000 people of Italian ancestry, as well as a number of Jewish refugees fleeing Germany without trial or hearings. Around 67% of those with Japanese heritage were U.S. citizens and many of the rest had spent several decades in the country by 1942. It is important to acknowledge this history and take a stand of never again.

For the project TSURU for Solidarity, never again is now. The goals of TSURU (Japanese for crane) for Solidarity is to educate, advocate, and protest to close all U.S. concentration camps; build solidarity with other communities that have experienced forced removal, detention, deportation and separation of families; & coordinate inter-generational, cross-community healing circles addressing the trauma of our shared histories. This summer TSURU for Solidarity will make a pilgrimage to Washington D.C. to close the camps. Standing on the moral authority of Japanese Americans who suffered the atrocities and legacy of U.S. concentration camps during WWII They say, “Stop Repeating History!” TSURU for Solidarity plans to take 125,000 origami paper cranes with them on their pilgrimage and have put out the call to all who want to help them reach this goal.

So, from now until the end of April you can bring paper cranes to JRPC and we will add them to the boxes we will be sending from Missoula. Whether you make 10, 100, or more we will be happy to send them along! Don’t know how to fold paper cranes? You can find lots of great tutorials on youtube or drop by JRPC and we will teach you! If you have any questions about this or have a group that is interested in a larger folding event email programs@jrpc.org or call 406.543.3955 and ask for Carol.

Big Sky Documentary Film Festival 2020

“Never be afraid to raise your voice for honesty, truth, and compassion against injustice, lying, and greed. If people all over the world would do this, it would change the earth.” William Faulkner

Dear Friends,

Its that time of year again. The Big Sky Documentary Film Festival is just around the corner and I am so excited about the incredible films we are sponsoring this year. During the 10-day festival (Feb 14-23) BSDFF will present a total of 56 features and nearly 100 short documentaries. The full lineup includes 24 World Premieres and 13 International Premieres. Festival screenings will take place at The Wilma, The Roxy, the Hellgate Elks Lodge and the all new Zootown Arts Community Center in downtown Missoula. Visit their website for more information, to read about the selected films, and purchase tickets.

Healing From Hate: Battle for the Soul of a Nation
Life After Hate, founded by former skinheads and neo-Nazis, supports white nationalists who are seeking to break away from radical movements. HEALING FROM HATE profiles the organization, exploring the root causes of radicalization, and considers what it might take to create a more tolerant world. Screenings: Elks Lodge Saturday, Feb 15th @ 9:00 pm & ZACC Monday, Feb 17th @ 3:00 pm

Colette
Former French Resistance member Colette Marin-Catherine refused to step foot in Germany for 74 years. That changes when a young history student named Lucie enters her life and convinces her to visit the concentration camp where the Nazis killed her brother. Screenings: Elks Lodge Sunday, Feb 16th @ 9:00 pm & Elks Lodge Saturday, Feb 22nd @ 6:30 pm

Objector
Like all Israeli youth, Atalya is obligated to become a soldier. Unlike most however, she questions the practices of her country’s military and decides to challenge her forced conscription. Despite her family’s wishes, she refuses military duty, knowing she will be imprisoned for her dissent. Screening: ZACC Thursday, Feb 20th @ 7:00 pm

A Syrian Woman | Human Stories From Jordan
After nearly a decade of conflict, Syrian refugee women have become some of the most vulnerable amid the crisis. Thousands have lost their families and husbands, and now must provide for their children, alone in an unfamiliar country. Hearing firsthand accounts of the refugee crisis in Jordan, we reflect on what it means to be a Syrian woman. We follow their experiences of survival – from displacement, danger, child-marriage, and trauma, to their resilience and hope to rebuild a better future for their children. Screenings: Elks Lodge Monday, Feb 17th @ 4:00 pm & ZACC Tuesday, Feb 18th @ 1:30 pm

Carol Schwartz

Jeannette Said No – Musical Tribute to Jeannette Rankin

Jeannette Said “No”

We are pleased to share this musical tribute to Montana’s Jeannette Rankin,
the first woman elected to Congress.

Jeannette Said “No” is composed by Joe DeFilippo and performed by the R.J. Phillips Band, a group of Baltimore musicians. Joe DeFilippo: vocals, piano, bass guitar; Sue Tice: fiddle; Bill Phelan: mandolin; Leslie Darr: background vocals; Bill Pratt: drums, organ, background vocals. Produced & recorded by: Bill Pratt @ the Bratt Studio, Baltimore,MD.

 

  

Jeannette Said No – music   

Joy Through Beauty

Dear friends,BA April 27 2015

Last year I had the pleasure of meeting and working with Philadelphia-based artist, Lily Yeh, who travels the world employing arts as a tool for social justice, community-building and personal transformation.  This is a work she describes as a living social sculpture, combining visual arts with community mobilizing to create beauty.  As Lily states, “where we dare to imagine and thrive, there we have a freedom and a joy nobody can control.  How do we create joy?  Through creating beauty.”  Continue reading